About

From Jomon pottery dating back to 10,000 BCE to the 1920’s Mingei movement and into contemporary 21st century ceramics, Japanese pottery has played a significant role in shaping American ceramics. Terms like wabi-sabi, raku, and anagama have become common vocabulary in the ceramics field, and artists of all kinds study chanoyu and Ikebana. Craft and process, which are so integral to the apprenticeship tradition in Japan, have become paramount for young ceramicists studying with traditional potters across the United States.

Showcasing some of the best contemporary Japanese and Japanese American ceramic artists in the country is only one curatorial focus of this 2016 exhibition. We hope viewers will come away with a greater appreciation of how, despite the many individual approaches, the artists’ connections to Japan have a profound impact on what they create with clay and why they create it. Michi literally means “road,” but it can signify “path,” “way,” “history,” or “story.” Although each ceramicist’s michi is distinct and personal, the artists share common ground in terms of design, aesthetics, and concepts that stem from their Japanese heritage.

– Yoshi Fujii & Juliane Shibata, co-curators

紀元前1万年前にさかのぼる縄文土器から1920年代の民芸運動や現代の陶芸に至るまで、日本の陶芸はアメリカの陶芸界をかたち作る上で重要な役割を担ってきました。侘び寂び、楽焼きや穴窯などは陶芸界でよく使われる用語になり、茶の湯や生け花を学ぶものも多くいます。日本でよく見られるような弟子修行で工芸やその過程を学ぶことはアメリカの若い陶芸家達の間にも広まってきています。

第一線で活躍する現代の日本人や日系アメリカ人陶芸家を集めることはこの作品展の企画目的のただ一部にしかすぎません。私たちは作家達の日本との接点が彼らが粘土で何を作り、なぜ作るのかということにどう影響しているのかをみるもの達によりよく理解してもらいたいと思います。“みち”は“道”の他に方法や手段であったり、歴史や物語という意味を示唆します。それぞれの作家の“みち”は違いますが、日系であることがデザインや美学、概念において共通のつながりを与えているのではないかと思います。

企画者:藤井嘉孝/ジュリアン・シバタ

 

thrown cups JS1